Cornwall Park

CORNWALL PARK

Birds

BIRDS

"The tui with his grand rich note made the woods musical; the great fat, slow pigeon cooed down upon you almost within reach nor took the trouble to fly away."

Sir John Logan Campbell, 1881, Poenamo.

Press the arrow to find out more about the birds in Cornwall Park here:

ALL

NATIVE

INTRODUCED

Blackbird Blackbird

Blackbird
(Turdus merula)

Watch or listen for: direct flight, cocks tail on landing. Male is black with orange bill, female is brown, young are red-brown and speckled. Walks and runs; 'listens' to find worms and insects in short grass or stirs up leaf litter. Attracted to fruit. Bathes in puddles or a bird-bath. Males fight over territory. Loud alarm cackle. Song (June to December) is a slow, mellow phrase with intervals.

California Quail California Quail

California Quail
(Callipepla californica)

Watch or listen for: runs and flies low with rapid wing beat. Feeds on grassland, perches on posts and low branches. Male has a prominent crest. Gives a 'ticking' call and crows loudly "chi-ca-go".

Eastern Rosella Eastern Rosella

Eastern Rosella
(Platycercus eximius)

Watch or listen for: brightly coloured, green, blue, red and yellow. Rapid flight, often in pairs. Perches high up but often feeds on the ground. Many calls, including whistles and chattering sounds.

Fantail Fantail

Fantail - Piwakawaka
(Rhipidura fulginosa placabilis)

Watch or listen for: acrobatic flight, spreading wings and tail as its name suggests. Chiefly in vegetation; above tree-tops in calm weather, catching insects. Vocal, with high-pitched squeaks; often heard before the bird is seen.

Grey Warbler Grey Warbler

Grey Warbler - Riroriro
(Gerygone igata)

Watch or listen for: a tiny bird, seen singly or in pairs. White tips to tail. Seeks insects in foliage or while hovering. Sings a lilting phrase at intervals while foraging.

NZ Wood Pigeon NZ Wood Pigeon

NZ Wood Pigeon - Kereru
(Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae)

Watch or listen for: 'heavy' flight with slow wing-beats. Perches high up, feeding on leaves and berries. White breast, dark green back. Call is a deep 'ooh'.

Paradise Shelduck Paradise Shelduck

Paradise Shelduck
- Putangitangi (Pari)
(Tadorna variegata)

Watch or listen for: usually in pairs. Male has a black head and deep voice, female has white head and shrill voice. Call in flight or when disturbed. Regularly breed in the Park with up to ten young.

Pheasant Pheasant

Pheasant
(Phasianus colchicus)

Watch or listen for: colourful male has a long tail. Most have a white collar but some of the Park's birds are the black-necked variety. Marks its presence by a loud two or three-note call.

Silver-eye Silver-eye

Silver-eye - Tauhou
(Zosterops lateralis)

Watch or listen for: moss-green with grey mantle and rust under-parts; white ring round eye. Constantly on the move, seeking insects and spiders, attracted to fruit. Springtime song is shrill warbling sequence.

Song Thrush Song Thrush

Song Thrush
(Turdus philomelos)

Watch or listen for: direct flight. Brown with speckled breast. Walks, runs and pauses to find worms and insects. Hammers snails on a favoured stone or post to break the shell. Ignores fallen fruit. Song (May to December) is rapid and continuous with repeated clear notes, higher pitched than Blackbird.

Tui Tui

Tui - Parsonbird
(Prosthermadera novaeseelandiae)

Watch or listen for: swooping flight and aerial displays. Sizes differ, with male bigger than female. Notice white throat feathers and iridescent green, blue and brown plumage of this 'black' bird. Many and various calls, some above our hearing though the bird's beak is moving.

Welcome Swallow Welcome Swallow

Welcome Swallow
(Hirundo tahitica neoxena)

Watch or listen for: swift, skimming flight to catch insects over pasture or around trees and buildings. Rests on wires and posts. Pointed wings and forked tail. Twittering call. Builds mud nest on or within buildings.

Bird Gallery

Bird Gallery

Many other birds can be found at Cornwall Park, here is a selection of them.

Thank you to Michael Taylor – Ornithological Society of New Zealand, Auckland Region, for his advice and assistance.